Exercise is, indeed, medicine.
    Exercise has some of the same outcomes as many popular medications, such as blood pressure medications, cholesterol medications, and diabetes medications. Below you will find general information about exercise and information pertaining to the effects of exercise on different medical conditions. Read more...


How much exercise is recommended for good health?

    Engaging in 150 minutes of moderate level exercise or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise each week can reduce your risk for chronic health complications and significantly lower your weight and your need for prescription medications. Read more...

How hard should you be exercising?
    Exercise should not be an all out event. When you exercise at an intensity level of "somewhat hard" you reap significant benefits, i.e. lower blood pressure, reduced cholesterol levels, better mood, stress reduction, weight loss. Read more...


People with chronic disease may have slightly different guidelines and recommendations for exercise. Click here for your special exercise needs.

Sample exercise log:


5 minute of warm-up increases blood circulation to muscles, elevates body temperature, dilates blood vessels to allow more blood flow, and loosens connective tissues preparing the body for more vigorous exercise. Warm-up effort should be very light. Walking or cycling at an easy pace are considered to be effective warm-ups.

30-60 minutes of more vigorous exercise elevates the heart rate because the working muscles require more oxygen and other nutrients. During this aerobic exercise, the blood pressure increases to help to circulate the necessary nutrients around the body. Breathing becomes more labored, because the muscles are demanding more oxygen. Effort during aerobic exercise should be somewhat hard to almost hard to maximize the health benefits of exercise. If you are just starting on your exercise plan, or if you have a medical condition that you are being treated for (and you have your doctor's OK to exercise), you should limit your exercise effort to fairly light for several sessions, gradually increasing the time and intensity. If you have chest pain or severe shortness of breath at rest or with exercise, you should see your doctor immediately.

15 minutes of strength training exercises increases muscle mass and improves your functional capacity. You can use weight machines, dumbbells,  resistance bands, or your own body weight. You should do as many repetitions as you need to in order that the muscle becomes fatigued. Use a weight that will allow you to complete between 8 and 15 repetitions. If you are just starting strength training or if you have a medical condition that you are being treated for (and you have your doctor's OK to exercise), you should limit your exercise effort to fairly light for several sessions, gradually increasing the time and intensity. If you have chest pain or severe shortness of breath at rest or with exercise you should see your doctor immediately.

5-10 minutes of stretching and cool down allows your body to return to a resting state; your blood pressure, heart rate, and respiratory rate return to baseline. When you stretch, you should include several stretches that target the major muscle groups of the body, i.e legs, back, chest, shoulders. Be sure to hold the stretch for 10-30 seconds without bouncing. The remainder of the cool down time should consist of gentle walking or cycling.